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What Is Stream Sniping and How To Prevent It From Happening To You!

If you are an avid gamer, you have heard of the term “Stream Sniping” at least 100 times already. Whether it’s Ninja reporting some kid who just happened to kill him, not knowing it was Ninja on Fortnite, or seeing your favorite streamer get ganged up on by 5 or more people who are dancing after they kill the streamer.

What is Stream Sniping? Stream Sniping is to “follow a person who is streaming gameplay footage (usually on Twitch or Ustream) into the same games, using their stream to find and harass them (often for hilarious results.)” TheGIR explains:

The term “Stream Sniping” originated from a Battle.net forum post titled “What Is Stream Sniping?” on November 13th, 2011. User Harharwa stated that the term was “the practice of viewing an opponent’s live stream in order to gain an advantage in a multiplayer video game.”

Stream Sniping started heavily when Battle Royales made it into the gaming scene with PUBG and Fortnite being the main targets. PUBG stream sniping was different from Fortnite stream sniping, but how are they different?

PUBG has a Voice Chat system that allows you to hear other enemy players when they are nearby, meaning you can hear anything they say from 1 house away. Not only do they have a different Voice Chat System, but PUBG players also have a different idea of Stream Sniping than Fortnite players.

Not All PUBG Stream Snipes Come In The Form of Killing

Then There Are The Annoying PUBG Stream Snipers

PUBG is made for the more mature audience, while Fortnite targets the younger audience. Those principles along with a few feature differences are what set PUBG Stream Snipers farther out from Fortnite Stream Snipers. In other words, if you are Ninja, your fans are looking to defeat you to have the ultimate bragging rights against their peers!

Since Ninja’s fanbase averages the age range from 7-13-year-olds and plays a game that attracts younger people, he is more likely to be Stream Sniped than a PUBG player. That being said, what do Fortnite players do to Stream Snipe?

Fortnite players want to Stream Snipe to make themselves look better so they will go to any extent to kill a popular streamer for fame.

Here’s A Prime Example

A kid is dead-set on killing Ninja for clout, and he has also decided to stream it! He must’ve not been aware that you can get banned for Stream Sniping!

There are a very few PUBG players who are this excited about killing a popular streamer, but there are a lot of Fortnite players who would risk a ban for some fame.

How to prevent Stream Sniping from happening to you?

There are many ways to prevent this from happening, but one of the most efficient ways of stopping Stream Sniping is to up your stream delay. You may be thinking, “But Shogun, what’s stream latency?”.  Stream latency is the delay between your camera capturing an event and the event being displayed to viewers.

In other words, if Mike donates to money to you and you thank him with a 6-second stream latency, Mike won’t hear “Thank you Mike” until 6 seconds have passed. Point being that if you don’t want to be Stream Sniped like Ninja every stream or so (Calm down, I’m exaggerating), then up your stream delay to prevent people from queueing with you.

If you get Stream Sniped, play it cool because that means you are getting attention as a streamer and you have haters! Having haters is such a good accomplishment because they know who you are! Alright, enough with the streamer pep talk because that is for an article in the future!

Do you think I stated some good or bad points? Let me know down in the comment section below!

Johnny Django
Co-founder of Digagami. Johnny Django is a gaming enthusiast with raw-unfiltered opinions who has a major love for the Video Game Community.

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